Day On The Bay

A great deal of my childhood was spent on the Chesapeake Bay, netting crabs (or trying to), collecting oyster shells, and waving at passing sailboats. My great grandmother would steam blue crabs and we’d sit in the sunshine and talk about small town stuff. A recent visit showed me that the bay is healing after decades of pollution and neglect. I like to remember that every little act of conservation and responsible waste disposal (recycling, repurposing, reusing) is aiding the bay’s healing.

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A live owl hosts the MD Park Service tent at a neighborhood festival.

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Solar panels on a roof.

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Oxford-Bellevue Ferry

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Signs in this area once warned against swimming in polluted waters, now signs boast a wetlands conservation area.

Signs in this area once warned against swimming in polluted waters, now signs boast a wetlands conservation area. Please note: sailboats pollute much less than motor boats.

Learn more about the Chesapeake Bay at cbf.org!

Alyssa works at multiple MOMs locations.

About alyssabdh

Natural Health
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